Jasper Server Permission Denied error

Occasionally, Jasper Server has an error relating to being unable to write files. The errors show up in the Apache web server log, catalina.out.

You have probably started the service as the user root on accident. This will cause ownership to change to root on some log files. Then when you log back on as user jasper and restart your server, the Apache logs are filling with messages about not being able to write files. Jasper is just not working properly. Run the following command to restore the proper ownership to all files in the Jasper directory. You must run the following command as root:

>find /home/jasper/jasper-server-3.7 -user root -exec chown jasper.jasper {} \;

This will find all the files that root changed ownership and change the ownership back to the proper jasper user.

Enabling Apache support for pretty permalinks in WordPress

In WordPress, there is a feature called PermaLinks. These create URL’s that are better searched by Google. So instead of getting a URL like http://example.com?id=454, you get something like http://example.com/enabling-apache-support-for-pretty-permalinks-in-wordpress. Now the search engines will see a URL that they can parse for information, rather than an arbitrary number.

Enabling Apache support for what is known as address rewriting is accomplished by modifying your httpd.conf file. Open the file and look for the line that says:

<Directory “/var/www/html”>

In this section there will be a line:

AllowOverride None

Change this line to:

AllowOverride All

Save the httpd.conf file. Then restart Apache.

Now when you click, Enable Permalinks in WordPress, you will have a search engine friendly blog.

Setting the Session Timeout in Tomcat

You can specify the timeout of a session in the deployment descriptor of your web application (web.xml):

<web-app>
  <session-config>
    <session-timeout>60</session-timeout>
  </session-config>

  ...
</web-app>

The number within the session-timout element must be expressed in minutes.

Be sure to restart Tomcat to take the new setting.

How to install Subversion with Apache HTTPD

  1. Ensure you have Apache installed on your system.
  2. Ensure you have mod_dav_svn installed:
    > yum -y update mod_dav_svn
  3. Install ssl support to enable https:
    > yum install mod_ssl
  4. Edit /etc/httpd/conf.d/subversion.conf and append the following lines to the end of your config file:

    <Location /svn>
    DAV svn
    SVNParentPath /var/svn
    AuthType Basic
    AuthName "Subversion repository"
    AuthUserFile /etc/svn-auth-file
    AuthzSVNAccessFile /etc/svn-serve.conf
    Require valid-user
    </Location>

  5. Create a file called /etc/svn-auth-file
    Assign permission:

    > chown root.root /etc/svn-auth-file
    > chmod 644 /etc/svn-auth-file

  6. Add users to /etc/svn-auth-file (one per line) in the form:
    tom:$apr1$hDMIx…$abctozvZbC9J6/heHBBe481You can use htpasswd to do this automatically:

    > ### First time: use -cm to create the file
    > ### Use -m to use MD5 encryption of the password, which is more secure
    > htpasswd -m /etc/svn-auth-file harry
    New password: *****
    Re-type new password: *****
    Adding password for user harry
    > htpasswd /etc/svn-auth-file -m sally
    New password: *******
    Re-type new password: *******
    Adding password for user sally
    >

  7. Create a file called /etc/svn-serve.conf
    Fill it with:

    [/]
    *=
    svnUser=rw


    The user svnUser is being granted read and write access to all projects, while all other users (*) are being denied access.

  8. Assign permissions:

    > chown root.apache /etc/svnserve.conf
    > chmod 640 /etc/svnserve.conf

  9. Create /var/svn.

    > mkdir -p /var/svn
    > chmod 755 /var/svn

  10. If you are running SELinux, run:

    > chcon -R -h -t httpd_sys_content_rw_t /var/svn
    > setsebool -P httpd_unified=1

  11. You are now ready to being adding Subversion repositories!